Wednesday, September 2, 2020

Supernatural Studies Open Calls (Summer/Fall 2020)

An interestng set of calls from the journal Supernatural Studies.

https://www.supernaturalstudies.com/calls-for-papers


Call for Papers, Spring 2021 Special Issue on Disease

Supernatural Studies invites submissions for a special issue, inspired by the current crisis, on supernatural engagements with disease, broadly conceived. We welcome essays that explore this theme through explicitly monstrous tropes, e.g. zombies, vampires, parasitism, haunting, and other uncanny embodiments of sickness and contagion. We also invite investigations of narratives that deploy the supernatural to engage existing cultural “maladies” that infectious diseases routinely expose and exacerbate: e.g., economic precarity, healthcare inequities, media mis/disinformation, science skepticism and denial, environmental challenges, and experiences of alienation. We encourage submissions that explore oral, written, and/or visual texts across time, place, and genre. To be as relevant as possible, this special issue will be published in Spring 2021; for guaranteed consideration, submissions should be sent by 31 October 2020 (since Halloween is canceled anyway).

Supernatural Studies is a peer-reviewed journal that promotes rigorous yet accessible scholarship in the growing field of representations of the supernatural, the speculative, the uncanny, and the weird. The breadth of “the supernatural” as a category creates the potential for interplay among otherwise disparate individual studies that will ideally produce not only new work but also increased dialogue and new directions of scholarly inquiry.

Submissions should be 5,000 to 8,000 words, including notes but excluding Works Cited, and follow the MLA Handbook, 8th ed. (2016); notes should be indicated by superscript Arabic numerals in text and pasted at the end of the article. International submissions should adhere to the conventions of U.S. English spelling, usage, and punctuation. Manuscripts should contain no identifying information, and each submission will undergo blind peer review by at least two readers. Contributors are responsible for obtaining any necessary permissions and ensuring observance of copyright. Submissions should be emailed to supernaturalstudies@gmail.com as an attached Microsoft Word file.


General Call for Papers

Supernatural Studies is a peer-reviewed journal that promotes rigorous yet accessible scholarship in the growing field of representations of the supernatural, the speculative, the uncanny, and the weird. The breadth of “the supernatural” as a category creates the potential for interplay among otherwise disparate individual studies that will ideally produce not only new work but also increased dialogue and new directions of scholarly inquiry. To that end, the editorial board welcomes submissions employing any theoretical perspective or methodological approach and engaging with any period and representations including but not limited to those in literature, film, television, video games, and other cultural texts and artifacts.

Submissions should be 5,000 to 8,000 words, including notes but excluding Works Cited, and follow the MLA Handbook, 8th ed. (2016); notes should be indicated by superscript Arabic numerals in text and pasted at the end of the article. International submissions should adhere to the conventions of U.S. English spelling, usage, and punctuation. Manuscripts should contain no identifying information, and each submission will undergo blind peer review by at least two readers. Contributors are responsible for obtaining any necessary permissions and ensuring observance of copyright. Submissions should be emailed to supernaturalstudies@gmail.com as an attached Microsoft Word file.

Submissions are accepted on a continuous basis, and those accepted for publication will be placed in the earliest possible issue according to publication schedule and needs.

 

CFP Twin Peaks Season 3 Conference (12/1/2020; virtual event)

 See https://www.supernaturalstudies.com/calls-for-papers for more details. PDF version at https://www.academia.edu/40619859/CFP_2021_Online_Conference_on_Twin_Peaks_The_Return_Deadline_1_Dec_2020_.

 

Organized in partnership with Lynchland (https://www.facebook.com/Lynchland), Cork University (Ireland), Université Bordeaux Montaigne (France) & Université de Liège (Belgium), the Supernatural Studies Association, and the film magazine La Septième Obsession (France).

This international online conference will focus on the third season of Mark Frost and David Lynch’s acclaimed television series Twin Peaks, an eighteen-part event that premiered on Showtime in May 2017. While the original two seasons of Twin Peaks (1990-91) and Lynch’s feature-length film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) have been the subject of numerous academic and critical studies, season 3 returned to television over 25 years later. The season has yet to benefit from an international conference that is interdisciplinary in scope. We are excited about the conference’s accessible online format and its potential to engage with international colleagues in diverse fields of research.

Suggested topics of exploration include, but are not limited to:

• the role of time in season 3

• expanded space and geography in season 3

• aesthetics of season 3

• the use of special effects in season 3

• the relationship between season 3 and earlier seasons of Twin Peaks (1990-91), as well as the film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992)

• the relationship between the 3rd season and Mark Frost’s The Secret History of Twin Peaks (2016) and Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier (2017)

• Homer’s Odyssey

• electromagnetism

• the American West and/or Western films

• the 2008 economic crisis

• parallel universes

• doppelgangers and avatars

• the atomic bomb

• the supernatural

• mythology & spirituality

• representations of gender and race in season 3

We welcome papers from the fields of television and film studies, art history, literature, sociology, psychology, gender studies, religious studies and fields in the arts, humanities, and sciences. Panels in both English and French will be organized during the conference weekend, June 19-20, 2021.

While it is expected that papers will reference earlier seasons of Twin Peaks and/or David Lynch’s filmography, please keep in mind that the focus of this conference is the third season of Twin Peaks. Therefore, papers dedicated exclusively to the first two seasons of the series or the film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me will not be accepted.

Abstracts (in English or French) of 300-500 words, accompanied by a C.V. will be accepted until December 1, 2020 at: TwinPeaksConference@gmail.com

Notification of the conference program will be sent by January 15, 2021.

Conferences will be limited to 20-minute presentations.

Conference organizers: Franck Boulègue (Associated Scholar – University of Liège & author of Twin Peaks: Unwrapping the Plastic), Marisa C. Hayes (Sorbonne Nouvelle – Université Paris 3, film & co-editor, Fan Phenomena: Twin Peaks), and Roland Kermarec (founder & curator of Lynchland (https://www.facebook.com/Lynchland), with additional assistance from Matt Zoller Seitz.

 

Monday, August 24, 2020

CFP The Gothic Age of Television: Edited Collection (11/1/2020)

The Gothic Age of Television: Edited Collection, Call for Papers
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2020/08/17/the-gothic-age-of-television-edited-collection-call-for-papers

deadline for submissions:
November 1, 2020


full name / name of organization:
Aoise Stratford and Joel Hawkes

contact email:
gothicagetv@gmail.com




The Gothic Age of Television

Edited Collection, Call for Papers



The last three decades have witnessed a proliferation of Gothic television programs. Some provide a platform for the Gothic’s most fantastic mode of expression, with vampires, werewolves, and zombies invading our screens. Closer to home but decidedly unheimlich, domestic spaces are haunted by uncanny secrets in programs from Twin Peaks to Top of The Lake. Still other programs, like Game of Thrones and Black Mirror, capture the Gothic’s obsession with barbaric pasts and threatening futures. Subtle elements of Gothic emerge in a wide range of non-Gothic programming, such as Mad Men and Breaking Bad, revealing the true extent of the genre’s influence.

Perhaps, just as Black Mirror’s techno-mediated future reflects – and reflects upon – the present moment, this Gothic resurgence responds to the transformations and uncertainties of our time. In other words, we might read the Gothic, as it repeatedly has been, as a genre that re-emerges at times of cultural anxiety.

The screens, and the streaming services that play this Gothic programming might, then, themselves be read as “Gothic devices,” even more transformative than the technologies that that have inspired and shaped the Gothic narratives of past centuries.

This call for papers requests proposals that explore this resurgence in the Gothic as it is mediated through television programming, and the proliferation of screens and streaming services, at the beginning of the 21st century.

The collection looks to theorise this Gothic revival. Papers might offer close readings of particular shows, ponder themes and tropes, trace trends in programming, consider the importance of the television medium in this revival, or examine the Gothic technologies of streaming screens and other devices.

The collection looks to be, like Frankenstein’s monster, hybridic, a composite, and larger than the sum of its parts, deploying a range of critical methodologies and lenses--including Queer theory, postmodernism, and post-human studies--and seeking to embrace some of the many different ways in which we can have conversations about Gothic Television.

Essays might examine shows such as (but not limited to),

Stranger Things, Penny Dreadful, Carnival Row, Outlander, Buffy, Angel, Vampire Diaries, True Blood, Sherlock, Twin Peaks: The Return, Sharp Objects, Mad Men, Black Mirror, Top of the Lake, Game of Thornes, Frankenstein Chronicles, The Walking Dead, American Horror Story, Supernatural, The X-Files, Bates Motel, Hannibal.

Essays might explore a number of topics, and ask and answer a variety of questions of Gothic television, such as (but not limited to),

Streaming, binging, booting, seriality, and the structure of Gothic television

  • How do screen mediums and consumption habits speak to a sense of the Gothic?
  • 21st century spaces / 21st century Gothic
    • How is space/place/setting important to Gothic television? What Gothic implications are there for the “space” of the streaming screen?
  • Twin Peaks: The Return
    • Why is Twin Peaks: The Return important? How does it make use of the Gothic?
  • Vampires and their slayers
    • How does the vampire inhabit the new century, this gothic revival, and an age of streaming screens?
  • Dissecting 21st century monsters
    • What and who are the important monsters of this Gothic television revolution?
  • Gothic nostalgias
    • How do Gothic shows (re)imagine the past? What is the relationship of the Gothic to the plethora of reboots, returns, and sequels on our screens?
  • Gothic futures
    • How do Gothic television shows imagine the future? What kind of future is Gothic programming creating?
  • Gothic fantasy
    • How do Gothic and fantasy interact on our screens? What has led to the rise of this important sub-genre?
  •  Gothic marginalities
    • How are those on the margins important to the Gothic? How are questions of race, gender, class, or sexuality important in terms of marginality and isolation, but also community, inclusivity, and diversity? What is the role of the so-called “normative”?

Abstracts of 300 words and a brief bio should be sent to the editors, Aoise Stratford (Cornell University) and Joel Hawkes (University of Victoria) at gothicagetv@gmail.com

Deadline for abstracts is 1 November 2020. (Final papers will be of about 5000 words, due end of April.)



Last updated August 19, 2020

CFP Children of the Night Conference (9/15/2020; Brasov, Translyvania 10/12-14/2020)

This sounds like a great event if you're in Europe.


The Children of the Night Conference series is a non-profit academic initiative, supported by worldwide renowned Dracula experts.

Our aim is to present groundbreaking research on Bram Stoker, his novel Dracula and related topics on a bi-annual basis.

Participation is open to everyone who has a truly interesting paper to present. Moreover, the conferences will feature artistic contests and will be accompanied by a cultural program.

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS IS OPEN: PLEASE SEND US YOUR ABSTRACTS!

(Full call at https://dracongress.jimdofree.com/call-for-papers/.)


Call for Papers 2020

We invite all persons who are interested in speaking at the 2020 conference to submit an abstract of 150 - max. 250 words plus a meaningful title indicating the planned content of your presentation. The official language of the conference is English; papers will be accepted, presented and published only in English. The abstracts must be submitted by email and fit the conference main topics.



All speakers are requested to prepare a visual presentation. Accepted formats: Microsoft PowerPoint, Adobe PDF or a folder with .jpg images, ordered by file name. Please bring your presentation on a USB stick (flash drive). Please limit the size of your file to 25 Megabyte maximum.



Registration -- Procedure & Fees


Indication of interest

If you are interested to speak at the conference but have no abstract ready yet, please send us a short email, so that we have you on our radar. The earlier we know who would like to participate in the conference, the better we can plan it. The same applies for potentials participants in the artistic contests.


Abstract deadline

Abstracts and fiction contributions must be submitted before 15 Septeber 2020. Please use the Abstract Submission Form below.


Approval

All submitted abstracts are subject to approval by our Scientific Committee. Review will take place continuously and may take 2-4 weeks.


Registration and payment

After your abstract has been approved, please pay the conference fee to our bank account. Please indicate your name and your country while making the payment. After your fee has been received, you will be automatically be added to our registration list and be admitted to the conference. For payments not made from an Euro, British Pound or US Dollar accounts, we recommend using Transferwise.


Fee schedule

The regular fee for participants is 149,-- Euros. For listeners-only, students without regular income and participants from the East-European countries, there is a reduced fee of 99,-- Euros only.

Day ticket for spontaneous visitors: 33,-- Euros.

Staff and students of Transilvania University of Brasov: Reduced day ticket price of 15,-- Euros.

The costs of hotel, lunch and dinner are not included, but Transilvania University of Brașov will host all participants for a special evening banquet or dinner.



Account Details (see https://dracongress.jimdofree.com/call-for-papers/)




Excursions

A guided walk through the centre of Brașov will be free of charge.

Further excursions: t.b.d.


Flights and Accommodation

Flights and accommodation should be booked by the participants. We recommend using flight searching engines such as Priceline, Cheaptickets or Kayak, and hotel booking platforms such as www.booking.com.

We recommend to book your flight to Bucharest well in advance. From Bucharest, there are several bus and train services to Brașov. Alternatively, you can travel via Sibiu (Hermannstadt).

Prices for food and accommodation in Brașov are moderate, compared to other European countries, especially the UK and Ireland.




Email of the Organising Committee: dracongress@gmail.com


Please send all communication regarding the conferences to this email address only, not to the University or our private email addresses.


Sunday, August 16, 2020

CFP Critical Approaches to Horror in Doctor Who (abstracts by 1/4/2021)

Critical Approaches to Horror in Doctor Who - Chapters Sought
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2020/08/03/critical-approaches-to-horror-in-doctor-who-chapters-sought

deadline for submissions:
January 4, 2021


full name / name of organization:
Robert F. Kilker / Kutztown University


contact email:
kilker@kutztown.edu




Although Doctor Who creator Sydney Newman wanted his show to be educational and avoid so-called “bug-eyed monsters,” the popularity of the Daleks in the second serial ensured that it would be better known for scaring kids into hiding behind the sofa. Adaptable as the science-fiction program is to fit a variety of other genres (e.g. the Western, screwball comedy, romance, period drama), horror dominates its cultural memory and ongoing practice. While there have been some critical essays over the years examining this aspect of the show, no book has been devoted to a more sustained examination of the generic work of horror in Doctor Who. This edited collection will remedy that absence.



More specifically, this book will serve as a thoughtful examination of the ways Doctor Who operates in the horror genre, in its complication of generic definitions, its ideological work, and its relation to fandom. Emerging and advanced scholars are invited to submit chapters exploring broadly an aspect of horror in classic and/or modern Doctor Who,as well as in-depth examinations of particular episodes. I am especially interested in having the following subtopics and/or episodes represented within the collection but welcome submissions on other matters as well:



  • Body horror
  • Fear of technology
  • Fan experience (hiding behind the sofa, etc.)
  • Folk horror
  • Possession stories
  • Gothic horror
  • Ecohorror
  • The monstrous feminine
  • Vampires, werewolves, mummies
  • Zombies
  • Recurring monsters (Daleks, Cybermen, Weeping Angels, etc.)
  • Pastiches of classic horror films
  • Influence on the horror film tradition
  • Alien invasion narratives
  • The Terrible Child
  • “Terror of the Autons”
  • “The Daemons”
  • “The Green Death”
  • “The Ark in Space”
  • “Pyramids of Mars”
  • “The Seeds of Doom”
  • “The Robots of Death”
  • “The Talons of Weng-Chiang”
  • “Horror of Fang Rock”
  • “Kinda”/“Snakedance”
  • “Ghost Light”
  • “Blink”
  • “Midnight”
  • “Night Terrors”
  • “The God Complex”
  • “Listen”
  • “Mummy on the Orient Express”
  • “Heaven Sent”
  • “Oxygen”
  • “The Haunting of Villa Diodati”




Please submit abstracts of approximately 500 words along with a brief bio to Robert F. Kilker at kilker@kutztown.edu by January 4, 2021. Articles will be limited to 6,000 words (this includes notes and bibliography).



Abstracts due: January 4, 2021

Articles due: May 28, 2021

Edited articles due: October 15, 2021

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me (kilker@kutztown.edu).

 

Last updated August 6, 2020 

 

CFP Latin American Gothic Literature in its Early Stages: Trappings, Tropes, and Theories (NeMLA 2021) (proposals by 9/30/2020)

Latin American Gothic Literature in its Early Stages: Trappings, Tropes, and Theories (NeMLA 2021)
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2020/07/06/latin-american-gothic-literature-in-its-early-stages-trappings-tropes-and-theories

deadline for submissions:
September 30, 2020


full name / name of organization:
NeMLA Conference 2021


contact email:
megan.devirgilis@morgan.edu




The Gothic is having a moment, as it tends to do in times of collective panic and uncertainty. Even Latin America, whose geographical, linguistic and historical distinctiveness have supported its all-but-exclusion from global Gothic Studies, has experienced a rise in scholarship on contemporary Gothic horror—from studies on the double and hybridity to zombies and cannibals, among others. Typically excluded from this narrative, however, are theories on the origins and early representations of the Gothic, and how regional, linguistic and historical particularities nourished a Latin American Gothic tradition that, although indebted to its European Gothic predecessors, deviated from it in unique and meaningful ways. There has been some debate over the circulation of translations throughout Latin America: Did Edgar Allan Poe’s short stories, for example, circulate in French or, decades later, in English, and to what extent did his formal experimentation influence Latin American writers? This panel diverts from this limited scope of inquiry, suggesting instead a broader perspective that examines the complexity of literary currents, their subcategories, and their subjective means of classification. Why is it that Latin American literary scholarship only begins to use the term Gothic in reference to Carlos Fuentes when Eduardo Wilde, Juana Manuela Gorriti and Horacio Quiroga, among others, were experimenting with Gothic trappings, the occult and suspense? The purpose of this panel is to revisit Latin American literary works previously associated with more “respectable” and “valuable” literary currents in terms of the Gothic and a unique Latin American Gothic literary tradition. Of particular interest are theoretical approaches that revisit modernista, romantic and fantastic literature through a Gothic lens. Collectively, this panel will deepen scholarship on the dialectics at the heart of cultural production in the region: civilization/barbarity, indigenous/European, monstrous/homogenous, etc.

Please submit abstracts here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18591
 

Last updated July 9, 2020 

 

CFP The 5th Vampire Academic Conference (priposals by 9/14/20; virtual event 10/30-31/20)

The 5th Vampire Academic Conference
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2020/07/29/the-5th-vampire-academic-conference

deadline for submissions:
September 14, 2020


full name / name of organization:
The International Vampire Arts and Film Festival


contact email:
jelinej@scf.edu




The 5th Vampire Academic Conference
Virtually Hosted
October 30th 2020 9:00 am- 7:00 p.m. and October 31st 10:00 am- 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time

American Vampires
CALL FOR PAPERS

MAIN THEMES: This conference will focus on the American Vampire and how they are represented. There is a vast amount of literature and film representing American vampires such as Salem’s Lot, Anne Rice and her chronicles, Lost Boys, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Blade, Twilight and of course Bela Lugosi’s classic Dracula.

American Vampires KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS: To Be Confirmed

The State College of Florida’s Literary Guild, in conjunction, with The University of South Wales, and IVFAF, call for papers by scholars interested in presenting their researched essays on vampire literature, film, folklore, theatre, games, graphic novels, lifestyle, fashion, music and wider art in the 5th annual Vampire Academic Conference (VAC).

Themes for this year’s Conference include the American Vampire, with a non-exclusive focus on the enduring legacy of their iconic vampire films; the Fake News Vampire, examining the consequences when fiction and folklore are presented factually. The themes of vampires in society are also included in this call.

However, the VAC is not limited to these themes. The two overriding criteria for papers delivered at the conference are:

· They must be about Vampires

· They must be interesting!

This major interdisciplinary international conference aims to examine and expand debates around vampires in all their many aspects. We therefore invite researchers from a range of academic backgrounds to re/consider vampires as a phenomenon that reaches across multiple sites of production and consumption, from literature and film to theatre and games to music and fashion and beyond. What accounts for this Gothic character's undying popular appeal, even in today's postmodern, digital, commercialized world? How does vampirism circulate within and comment upon mass culture?

We invite papers in genre theory & history, popular fiction, media culture, television theory, adaptation, journalism, comic studies, the transformative arts and other areas of film, literary and cultural studies in order to explore and expand the significance of the vampire as a figure of fascination across popular culture in shifting historic and social contexts.

We welcome proposals for conference papers of 15 minutes but also for pre-formed panels (of 3x15-minute papers), roundtable discussions, or formats that allow for the presentation of praxis (installations, lecture performances, for instance). We also want to support undergraduate scholarship: any current UG students interested in attending the VAC would be eligible for special, 10-15 minute presentation panels to facilitate their participation in an international conference at the undergraduate level.

Please submit a 300-500-word abstract, along with a short biography and indication of the format of your proposed presentation to Submittable by September 14th. If submitting a full panel proposal, the moderator should send a 50-word summary statement outlining the panel's title and central topic, along with all three proposals. Accepted submitters must confirm their commitment to present a finished written paper in a talk lasting approximately 20 minutes live at the conference via video conferencing. It must be their own original work.

This conference will not be charging since it is virtual.


The VAC runs in tandem with the Vampire Creative Congress, which focuses on the creative industries and featuring talks about filmmaking, writing, games etc. For more details, go to www.ivfaf.com

Abstracts will be moderated by the following panel:

+ Jeff Grieneisen, MFA, State College of Florida

+ Courtney Ruffner, Ph.D., State College of Florida

+ Julie Bess Jelinek, State College of Florida

+ Craig Hooper, University of South Wales and IVFAF



Potential points of entry but not limited to:

+ Transylvania or Pennsylvania? America and vampires

+ Women and the Vamp

+ Messy Eaters – gore and violence in vampire stories

+ vampire fiction as subgenre (comedies, romances, YA literature, graphic novels, games, theatre)

+ the vampire’s role in genre evolution

+ the vampire as metaphor

+ vampires as signs of cultural change

+ the popular vampire in the literary mainstream

+ the evolution of sex and religion in vampire literature

+ the influence of cinema on literary vampires (and vice‐versa)

+ vampiric tropes in social networking, internet memes and new media culture

+ popular vampire fiction/film in the non‐western world

+ pedagogical applications of popular vampire texts

+ gender and the vampire and/or the vampire hunter

+ vampires and the depiction of alternative sexualities

+ other cultural studies applications of the vampire icon

This is an indicative list only and papers on any vampiric theme from any academic or practice background would be welcomed.

Last updated July 31, 2020 

 

CFP Vampire Studies (2021 PCA/ACA National Conference) (proposals by 11/1/2020)

Vampire Studies (2021 PCA/ACA National Conference)
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2020/08/07/vampire-studies-2021-pcaaca-national-conference

deadline for submissions:
November 1, 2020


full name / name of organization:
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association


contact email:
pcavampires@gmail.com




The co-chairs of the PCA/ACA Vampire Studies area are soliciting papers, presentations, panels and roundtable discussions that cover any aspect of the Vampire for the Annual National Popular Culture Association Conference to be held in Boston, MA from March 31-April 3, 2021. You must be a member of the PCA to submit a proposal.

This year is a return to the aborted theme from Philadelphia, the legacy of Dracula. Anyone who was accepted last year may resubmit their proposal for an automatic acceptance. As well as Dracula, we are particularly interested in papers, presentations, and panels that cover:

Vampires at the end of the world and beyond

The vampire on legacy television shows (i.e. Dark Shadows, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Moonlight, The Vampire Diaries, The Originals)

The vampire on recent television shows (i.e. What We Do In the Shadows, From Dusk Till Dawn, Castlevania)

Legacy Cinematic vampires (i.e. Nosferatu, Interview with the Vampire, Near Dark, Twilight etc.)

Recent Cinematic Vampires (i.e. Carmilla, Hotel Transylvania, Therapy for the Vampire etc.)

The Non-Western Vampire (i.e. Korean, Chinese, Latino/a/x, African)

Vampire Cultures and Contexts (i.e. vampire RPGs or other gaming universes, fan studies, graphic novels)

Vampires and the Marginalized (i.e. race, gender, sexualities, national origin)

Genres such as Gothic Horror, Urban Fantasy, Steampunk, Young Adult, Erotica, Comedy

The relationship between vampires and zombies or werewolves and/or other monstrous beings

Vampire studies (i.e. the vampire in the classroom, vampire scholarship)

Historic and contemporary vampiric locations and geographies (i.e. cemeteries, castles, cities)

And anything and everything in between!

To have your proposal/abstract considered for presentation, please submit your proposal/abstract of approximately 250 words at the Popular Culture Association Website. We also welcome complete panel proposals of 3-4 people.

Visit www.pcaaca.org to see examples of papers from recent PCA conferences.

If you have questions, contact us at pcavampires@gmail.com. Also, follow us on Twitter @pca_vampires or join our Facebook group Vampire Scholars.

Last updated August 10, 2020 

 

CFP Critically Reading "The Vampire Diaries" (8/14/20)

Sorry this is a bit late being posted. 

Updated: Call for Abstracts: Critically Reading "The Vampire Diaries"
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2019/10/27/updated-call-for-abstracts-critically-reading-the-vampire-diaries

deadline for submissions:
August 14, 2020


full name / name of organization:
Book Publication


contact email:
thevampirediariescollection@gmail.com




Vampires are a phenomenon that have captivated humans since ancient times, and continue to globally fascinate different target audiences. From vampires in early Chinese traditions to their depiction in early poems such as “The Vampire” by Heinrich August Ossenfelder, to Lord Byron’s “The Vampyre”, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, to vampires in more recent TV series and movies, this creature has not only evoked fear and horror but has also embodied both anxieties as well as desires of the culture and time in which it was created. Consequently, as vampire narratives today have started to go beyond the realms of horror, sometimes even turning the vampire into romantic heroes, they bring new insights to current issues across various fields.

This call for papers reaches out to scholars interested in working on interpretations of the CBS series The Vampire Diaries. This American supernatural teen drama features a diverse set of characters, both dead and undead, while touching on topics such as friendship, romance, adulthood, as well as depression, and aging. So far, no book length work has dealt with this complex series, and it is our aim to publish an in-depth analysis consisting of 10-11 chapters that offer critical and creative readings of this series.



We welcome contributions that investigate but are by no means limited to the following topics as they relate to The Vampire Diaries:

- Television studies

- Intertextuality/intermediality

- Importance of Social Media

- Gothic

- Gender

- Adolescence

- Aging

- Postmodern Approaches Anxieties/fears and desires

- Humor

- Transgression

- Mind Control

- History

- Fandom

- Canon—the relationships between the TV series, novels, and spin-offs (The Originals, Legacies, and Stefan’s Diaries novels).



Submissions already accepted for this volume have largely focused on gender and genre, so we would welcome submissions that broaden the focus of the collection. We are identifying the series, its antecedents and its spin-offs as examples of postmodernist storytelling, so this should be acknowledged in submissions.

What to send: 400-500 words abstracts (or complete papers, if available) and a brief author bio of 150 words should be submitted by August 14, 2020. If an abstract is accepted for the book, a full draft of the paper (6000-8000 words) will be required by October 31, 2020.

Proposed writing and publication schedule:

Writing schedule – Draft completed October 31, 2020

Revisions, editing – Completed November/December, 2020

Submission to publisher –January, 2021



Contact Info: Kimberley McMahon-Coleman, Nina Vanessa Weber & Iris-Aya Laemmerhirt Contact Email: thevampirediariescollection@gmail.com

Last updated July 15, 2020 

 

CFP Emerging Trends in Twenty-First-Century Horror (Spec Issue of LIT; 1/15/2021)

Emerging Trends in Twenty-First-Century Horror
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2020/05/28/emerging-trends-in-twenty-first-century-horror

deadline for submissions:
January 15, 2021


full name / name of organization:
LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory


contact email:
litjourn@yahoo.com




CFP: Emerging Trends in Twenty-First-Century Horror

Deadline for submissions: January 15, 2021

full name / name of organization: LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory

contact email: litjourn@yahoo.com

Horror is experiencing a boom in the twenty-first century, one that spans media, genres, and the culture at large. Get Out, IT, and A Quiet Place dominated the box office, the way paved for them by predecessors like Paranormal Activity, Insidious, and The Conjuring. US television has also seen its share of horror fare: The Walking Dead, American Horror Story, and Stranger Things have been staples of the small screen, not to mention the hundreds of “reality” shows that probe the paranormal. Horror fiction has also flourished: sales hit a four-year high in the UK in 2018, and in the US, horror consistently ranks among the most profitable genres. Horror video games have increased in number and variety, expanding into virtual reality. And Halloween is now the second-largest commercial holiday in the United States, an almost $9 billion industry; ticket sales to haunted attractions alone account for $300-500 million.

As the title suggests, this special issue of LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory seeks essays that examine emerging trends in horror. We are looking for essays that identify broad tendencies in terms of subject matter and content, innovations in style and form, ways in which changes to technologies, industries, or economics have influenced the genre, and the increasing global spread of horror production. Although we are, of course, interested in essays that focus on traditional forms, such as novels, feature-length films, and television shows, we also welcome essays that consider other forms of horror.

Essays may explore the following, although this list is by no means exhaustive, and we are equally interested in receiving essays on trends we haven’t thought of:
  • national and global/transnational horror film, television, and fiction and fandoms
  • horror production by women, people of color, and the LGBTQIA community
  • representations of gender, race, religion, age, class, nationality, and sexuality
  • horror television, long-form, serial horror, and anthologies
  • the role of streaming services such as Netflix, Hulu, Shudder, and Amazon Prime
  • “elevated” horror and other value-based categories applied to both texts and fans
  • cross-genre productions, such as gothic westerns, sci-fi horror, or crime/horror hybrids
  • found-footage horror and the use of social media or the internet
  • subgenres such as folk horror, ecohorror (including animal, plant, and fungal horror), political horror, urban/suburban gothic, haunted house stories, and dark comedy
  • toys, video games, virtual reality, cosplay, creepypastas, haunted/dark tourism, and other immersive and participatory experiences




LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory publishes critical essays that employ engaging, coherent theoretical perspectives and provide original, close readings of texts. Submissions must use MLA citation style and should range in length from 5,000-9,000 words. Please direct any questions relating to this CFP to the guest co-editors Karen J. Renner (karen.renner@nau.edu) or Dawn Keetley (dek7@lehigh.edu). Submissions should be emailed to litjourn@yahoo.com. Please include your contact information and a 100-200 word abstract in the body of your email. LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory also welcomes submissions for general issues.

Guest Editors: Karen J. Renner, Northern Arizona University, and Dawn Keetley, Lehigh University

Editors: Dwight Codr and Tara Harney-Mahajan
 

Last updated May 28, 2020 

 

Friday, June 12, 2020

CFP Monsters & the Monstrous (Open-Topic) (6/30/20 NEPCA; virtual 10/23-24/20)

Third revised call for papers:

Call for Papers on Monsters & the Monstrous (Open-Topic)

The Northeast Alliance for Scholarship on the Fantastic and the Monsters & the Monstrous Area invite paper proposals for the 2020 conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA) to convene at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester, New Hampshire, from Friday, 23 October, to Saturday, October 24.

The new revised deadline for proposals is June 30, 2020.


Please note: This year’s conference will be entirely virtual.





Monsters & the Monstrous Area:

Area Chair: Michael A. Torregrossa (Independent Scholar) (Popular.Preternaturaliana@gmail.com)

This area welcomes proposals that investigate any of the things, whether mundane or marvelous, that scare us. Through our sessions, we hope to pioneer fresh explorations into the darker sides of the intermedia traditions of the fantastic (including, but not restricted to, aspects of fairy tale, fantasy, gothic, horror, legend, mythology, and science fiction) by illuminating how creative artists have both formed and transformed our notions of monsters within these sub-traditions in texts from various countries, time periods, and media and for audiences at all levels. Our primary goal is to foster a better understating of monsters in general and to examine their impact on those that receive their stories as well as on the world at large. However, as a component of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association, the Monsters and the Monstrous Area is also especially interested in celebrating both the New England Gothic tradition and the life, works, and legacy of H.P. Lovecraft, a leading proponent of Weird Fiction and an immense influence on contemporary popular culture. (Further information on the area at https://popularpreternaturaliana.blogspot.com/.)


Please submit your proposal for the area via the online form at https://forms.gle/TTbp6EVTkYJqcGgM6.


Membership in NEPCA is required to present; further details on the can be found at https://nepca.blog/.


Northeast Alliance for Scholarship on the Fantastic: https://northeastfantastic.blogspot.com/.


Wednesday, June 10, 2020

CFP Weird Sciences and the Sciences of the Weird (Spec Issue of Pulse 6/30/20)

Apologies for the delay in posting this:

WEIRD SCIENCES AND THE SCIENCES OF THE WEIRD
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2020/03/10/weird-sciences-and-the-sciences-of-the-weird

deadline for submissions:
June 30, 2020


full name / name of organization:
PULSE - THE JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND CULTURE


contact email:
mbregovi@gmail.com


Recent scientific discoveries in climatology, animal cognition and microbiology have radically altered our conceptions of ourselves and the environment we live in, both on micro and macroscales. Zooming in on the human microbiome and out to the planetary ecosystem, or even further into infinite cosmic spaces, the sciences are revealing strange dynamics of human-nonhuman interconnectedness, doing away with the established anthropocentrism and the idea of human exceptionalism. Current theoretical discussions revolving around the human-environment relation have shifted their interests from discourse to matter, shedding new light on strange bodily assemblages composed of anaerobic bacteria which live in symbiotic relationships with the human body (Jane Bennett, Stacy Alaimo), other types of cognition and intelligent life apart from our own (Steven Shaviro) and, especially, the mechanisms by which human action, no matter how abstract or invisible, contributes to the global ecological transformations (Donna Haraway, Timothy Morton). The ultimate effect of these conceptual transformations is a certain sense of estrangement that is often, but not necessarily, tied to feelings of unease, horror and/or fascination. This specific affect is commonly referred to as the weird because it operates through disrupting our ordinary perception and experience, creating confusion and a sense of disorientation.

Strange modes of human-nonhuman interactions are steadily pervading contemporary theoretical thought which analyzes the weird as a specific form of affect, effect and aesthetics signaled by a sense of wrongness (Mark Fisher). In conjunction with an increasing awareness of these estranged environments, a growing tendency towards the aesthetics of the weird is visible in popular culture and contemporary art production. As a continuation of H.P. Lovecraft’s weird tradition, “the weird” is now bringing together some of the most exciting contemporary writers and filmmakers: China Miéville, Elvia Wilk, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Jeff VanderMeer, Athina Rachel Tsangari and Yorgos Lanthimos, to name just the most significant ones. Similar tendencies are also evident in TV shows such as True Detective (inspired by Thomas Ligotti’s nihilistic weird fiction), Stranger Things and the Twin Peaks revival (echoing Lovecraftian cosmic horror). The aesthetics of weird is also embraced by musicians such as Björk, Gazelle Twin, FKA Twigs and inscribed in particular new media art practices, especially bioart.

In this issue of Pulse, we aim to investigate the aesthetics, politics and ethics of the weird from various theoretical and disciplinary perspectives, particularly those within the framework of environmental humanities: ecocriticism, geocriticism, animal studies, critical plant studies, posthumanism, new materialism, actor-network theory, queer theory, xenofeminism etc. How do the sciences estrange our conceptions of the world and how is this articulated in artistic practices? Starting from the confluence of art and science, our aim is to map diverse territories of the weird in literature, film, music, television, video games, visual arts, comic books, dance, theatre and other media.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

— theory of the weird: posthumanism, speculative realism, object oriented ontology, new materialism

— cognitive and affective aspects of the weird

— the weird, supernatural and unheimlich

— New Weird and the Other

— speculative fiction, science fiction, horror and weird fiction

— intersections of the weird and grotesque, fantasy, magical realism, etc.

— Anthropocene, deep time and the weird

— animal and plant life and the weird

— multispecies ecologies, human-nonhuman entanglements

— anomalies, mutations and hybrids

— inorganic matter in arts and literature

— eerie landscapes and extinction

— weird bodies: trans-corporeality, queer, transhumanism


References:

Mark Fisher, The Weird and the Eerie, 2016, Repeater Books, London.

Julius Greve and Florian Zappe (eds.), Spaces and Fictions of the Weird and the Fantastic: Ecologies, Geographies, Oddities, 2019, Palgrave Macmillan, London.

Donna Haraway, 2016, Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, Duke Univ. Press

Steven Shaviro, Discognition, 2016, Repeater Books, London.



SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 30 June 2020

We welcome the submission of FULL ARTICLES (5000-6000 words) on these and related themes. We also publish BOOK REVIEWS(800-1000 words); please get in touch if there is a book you would like to review.

All articles should be prepared for blind review including the removal of authorship from the document file information. Submissions should include a cover sheet in a separately attached document containing: the paper title and short abstract (ca. 250 words) author’s name, affiliation, word count (including footnotes & references), and contact information. Article and cover sheet should be submitted in a .doc, .docx, or .odt (or similar open-source) file format. PDF submissions are also accepted but previously stated file formats are preferred where possible. References should be formatted according to Chicago style (Footnotes and Bibliography).

All articles and related material should be submitted to: submissions.pulse@gmail.com

For any inquires please feel free to contact us at pulse.scistudies@gmail.com. Please do not submit articles to this email address. For general information and to access previous issues of Pulse you can visit:

​Central and Eastern Europe Online Library: https://www.ceeol.com/search/journal-detail?id=2187

​Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/pulse.scistudies




Last updated March 13, 2020

This CFP has been viewed 723 times.

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

CFP Medial Afterlives of H.P. Lovecraft: Comic, Film, Podcast, TV, Video Game (8/31/2020)


This came across the Comix-Scholars listerv last week.


The Medial Afterlives of H.P. Lovecraft: Comic, Film, Podcast, TV, Video Game

Ed. Max José Dreysse Passos de Cavalho & Tim Lanzendörfer


We are seeking essays dealing with medial adaptations of the work of H.P. Lovecraft. Amidst the recent Lovecraft renaissance, the adaptation of Lovecraft’s stories, but also of “Lovecraftian” themes and motifs, into various kinds of audiovisual narratives has proliferated and become vastly successful in a number of guises. Critical discussions of this phenomenon, however, have often been restricted to the identification of Lovecraft’s themes, adaptation’s fidelity to Lovecraft’s texts, and the influence of Lovecraft on contemporary horror and weird fiction more generally. The proposed collection will expand the discussion of Lovecraft adaptation by interrelating strongly on the concrete formal and medial choices of adaptations with the specific demands (if there are any) of Lovecraft(ian) fiction. Departing from a theoretical discussion that has seen Lovecraft as either congenial to adaptation or entirely resistant to it, it aims to understand Lovecraftian adaptation as a means of negotiating different ways of representing the unrepresentable, and to question the notion of the unrepresentable itself. Lovecraftian adaptation goes beyond its own relation to Lovecraft’s fiction, and helps us understand the respective affordances of written fiction versus audio visual media, permitting us not just to see the peculiarities of Lovecraft better, but also to ask fundamental media-theoretical questions.

We are looking for essays that address the question of Lovecraft adaptation in visual, aural, and mixed media: professional and amateur films, TV series, podcasts, (video) games, comics, and other media. Media of interest may be “direct” adaptations of Lovecraft’s source material or those called “Lovecraftian,” and we encourage discussion of this latter term especially with regards to the question of what, if anything, gets “adapted” in so encompassing a term. Among the texts we are interested in are, for instance, the films produced by the H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society, the German Die Farbe, or The Color Out of Space (2020), but also older adaptations; radio plays and podcasts such as British Radio 4’s The Whisperer in Darkness (2019-2020), but also things like Tanis (2015-) or The White Vault (2017-); video games such as the Dead Space Series (2008-2013), Alan Wake (2010), Bloodborne (2015), At the Mountains of Madness (2016, still in early access), The Call of Cthulhu (2018), or Moons of Madness (2019), as well as older games such as Alone in the Dark (1992); the large number of Lovecraft and Lovecraftian comics, such as Alan Moore’s Providence series or Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodriguez’s Locke & Key (2008-2013). All of these are very much inter alia; we are looking for a wide variety of source texts.

Among the topics we are interested in are media-philosophical discussions of the problem of Lovecraft(ian) adaptation; interpretative readings of Lovecraft(ian) fiction; the affordances of medial forms (including their capacity to be both expansive and limited in their relationship to Lovecraft); the relationship between Lovecraft’s medial afterlives and the market; the question of Lovecraft and contemporary philosophy as reflected in the media texts; what Lovecraft adaptation can tell us about adaptation more generally; what is named by “Lovecraftian” in these texts; and a variety of other topics that address the complex of questions sketched above, ideally interrelating several of these issues. Especially when you aim to propose a “Lovecraftian” text, we would appreciate a rationale for this determination.

We are looking for 300-500 word abstracts and a short biography, to be submitted by August 31, 2020, to lanzendo@uni-mainz.de and maxdreys@uni-mainz.de. We will collect the most promising abstracts into a coherent volume addressing the problems laid out above, and will propose the collection to Palgrave Macmillan’s series Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture, who have already expressed an interest in the project. Finished essays of about 7000 words are expected around June 2021; details to be cleared later.






Tuesday, June 2, 2020

CFP NEPCA Monsters and the Monstrous (Open-Topic) (6/15/20; remote/virtual conference 10/24-25/20)


Call for Papers on Monsters & the Monstrous (Open-Topic)

The Northeast Alliance for Scholarship on the Fantastic and the Monsters & the Monstrous Area invite paper proposals for the 2020 conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA) to convene at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester, New Hampshire, from Friday, 23 October, to Saturday, October 24.

The revised deadline for proposals is June 15, 2020.

Please note: This year’s conference will either be hybrid (some sessions online and some face-to-face) or entirely virtual. NEPCA is dependent upon what the host institution, decides and their announcement will come in early June.




Monsters & the Monstrous Area:

Area Chair: Michael A. Torregrossa (Independent Scholar) (Popular.Preternaturaliana@gmail.com)

This area welcomes proposals that investigate any of the things, whether mundane or marvelous, that scare us. Through our sessions, we hope to pioneer fresh explorations into the darker sides of the intermedia traditions of the fantastic (including, but not restricted to, aspects of fairy tale, fantasy, gothic, horror, legend, mythology, and science fiction) by illuminating how creative artists have both formed and transformed our notions of monsters within these sub-traditions in texts from various countries, time periods, and media and for audiences at all levels. Our primary goal is to foster a better understating of monsters in general and to examine their impact on those that receive their stories as well as on the world at large. However, as a component of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association, the Monsters and the Monstrous Area is also especially interested in celebrating both the New England Gothic tradition and the life, works, and legacy of H.P. Lovecraft, a leading proponent of Weird Fiction and an immense influence on contemporary popular culture. (Further information on the area at https://popularpreternaturaliana.blogspot.com/.)



Please submit your proposal for the area via the online form at https://forms.gle/TTbp6EVTkYJqcGgM6.

Membership in NEPCA is required to present; further details on the can be found at https://nepca.blog/.

Northeast Alliance for Scholarship on the Fantastic: https://northeastfantastic.blogspot.com/.

Monday, February 24, 2020

CFP NEPCA Fantastic (Fantasy & Science Fiction / Monsters & the Monstrous) (6/1/2020; Manchester, NH 10/23-24/2020)


Please below for the combined call for papers for NEPCA's Fantastic Areas:


Call for Papers on the Fantastic (Fantasy & Science Fiction / Monsters & the Monstrous)

The Northeast Alliance for Scholarship on the Fantastic and the allied Fantastic Areas (Fantasy & Science Fiction and Monsters & the Monstrous) invite paper proposals for the 2020 conference of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA) to convene at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester, New Hampshire, from Friday, 23 October, to Saturday, October 24.

The deadline for proposals is June 1, 2020.

The 2020 conference is about 1 hour from Boston, just under 2 hours from Providence, RI, or around 2.5 hours from Burlington, VT, Hartford, CT, or Augusta, ME, about 3.5 hours from Albany, NY, 4.5 hours from New York City or Montreal, QC.



Fantasy & Science Fiction Area:

Area Chair: Amie A. Doughty (State University of New York, College at Oneonta), (Amie.Doughty@oneonta.edu)

Highlighting the more positive aspects of the fantastic genre, the Fantasy and Science Fiction area seeks to examine texts that bring about a sense of wonder in their receivers through their representation of the marvelous, and we welcome submissions from scholars of all levels for papers that explore any aspect of the intermedia traditions of the fantastic that might promote this work. Topics can include, but are not limited to, elements of fairy tale, fantasy, legend, mythology, and science fiction; proposals should investigate how creative artists have shaped and/or altered our preconceptions of these sub-traditions by producing innovative works in diverse countries, time periods, and media and for audiences at all levels.



Monsters & the Monstrous Area:

Area Chair: Michael A. Torregrossa (Independent Scholar) (Popular.Preternaturaliana@gmail.com)

This area welcomes proposals that investigate any of the things, whether mundane or marvelous, that scare us. Through our sessions, we hope to pioneer fresh explorations into the darker sides of the intermedia traditions of the fantastic (including, but not restricted to, aspects of fairy tale, fantasy, gothic, horror, legend, mythology, and science fiction) by illuminating how creative artists have both formed and transformed our notions of monsters within these sub-traditions in texts from various countries, time periods, and media and for audiences at all levels. Our primary goal is to foster a better understating of monsters in general and to examine their impact on those that receive their stories as well as on the world at large. However, as a component of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association, the Monsters and the Monstrous Area is also especially interested in celebrating both the New England Gothic tradition and the life, works, and legacy of H.P. Lovecraft, a leading proponent of Weird Fiction and an immense influence on contemporary popular culture. (Further information on the area at http://popularpreternaturaliana.blogspot.com/.)



Please submit your proposal for either area via the online form at https://forms.gle/TTbp6EVTkYJqcGgM6.

Membership in NEPCA is required to present; further details on the can be found at https://nepca.blog/.

Northeast Alliance for Scholarship on the Fantastic: https://northeastfantastic.blogspot.com/

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

CFP 2020 Supernatural Studies Conference (2/1/2020; Iona College 3/20/2020)

From Academia.edu:
https://www.academia.edu/40619859/2020_Supernatural_Studies_Conference_CFP_Deadline_Feb._1_2020

2020 Supernatural Studies Conference: Call for submissions

The Supernatural Studies Association invites submissions for the 2020 Supernatural Studies Conference, to be held at Iona College on Friday, March 20, 2020.

The conference welcomes proposals on representations of the supernatural in any form of text or artifact, such as literature (including speculative fiction), film, television, video games, social media, or music. Submissions regarding pedagogy and supernatural representations will also be considered, as will creative submissions that align with the conference's focus. There is no restriction regarding time periods or disciplinary and theoretical approaches (examples include literary, historical, and cultural studies approaches).

Abstracts of 300 words maximum should be sent to supernaturalstudiesconference@gmail.com  by the deadline of February 1, 2020. The registration deadline will be February 20, 2020.

Faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars are welcome to apply.

Please note that, due to location and funding, we do not have an associated conference hotel and cannot offer travel support.

Please feel free to share and/or re-post this call

Saturday, December 7, 2019

CFP Jewish Zombies (2/20/20; Penn State 10/27-28/2020)

A head's up from the MEARCSTAPA list:

Jewish Zombies
Call for Papers
Workshop at the Jewish Studies Program, Penn State University
October 27-28, 2020

The Jewish Studies Program at Penn State University presents an interdisciplinary academic workshop to examine zombies in the context of Jewish history and culture.

Throughout history, Jews have often been depicted as monstrous figures, such as demons and vampires, and Jews themselves have imagined Golems, werewolves, and other fantastic creatures to address predicaments and even answer questions of Jewish thought and experience. Yet zombies, the most persistent monsters of our time, have so far mostly eluded a critical examination from scholars engaging in Jewish Studies. This workshop will explore Jewish characters, images, and perspectives in zombie films, literature, comics, etc. from the early prehistory of the genre to the present; or, conversely, use the zombie or conceptions of the undead or living dead as a category of analysis to address problems of and questions about Jewishness in modern and premodern Jewish writing and thought.

We invite participants to examine the political and cultural linkages between zombie narratives and Jewish histories through various notions of loss and reanimation. Zombie tales present situations in which individuals lose their cognitive abilities and personal memories in the face of a social breakdown, when norms, values, and laws, the very safeguards of human existence, disappear; but they also address possibilities of restoration, revenge, and continuity. We will discuss the zombie in relation to other monstrous representations of Jewish identity, to think on the relationships between dehumanization practices and posthumanism narratives, and explore diverse moments when zombies, both in the past and the present, sink their teeth, metaphorically and not, into Jewish figures, history, and imagination.

Paper proposals should include a title, an abstract (300 words), institutional affiliation, and contact information. Please submit proposals to Kobi Kabalek (kabalek@psu.edu) by February 20, 2020.


Thursday, November 14, 2019

NEPCA Monsters Area 2019 Panels

Here are the final panel breakdowns for our inaugural Monsters and the Monstrous Area sessions. 


Northeast Popular Culture Association 2019 Annual Conference
15-16 November 2019
Sheraton Portsmouth Harborside Hotel, Portsmouth, NH


NEPCA Monsters and the Monstrous Area 2019
Michael A. Torregrossa, Area Chair

Session 5: Saturday 9:30-10:45am
Monsters and the Monstrous I: Reimagining Monsters (Thaxter, Lobby Level)
Chair: Don Vescio, Worcester State University

 “The Monstrosity of Heroism in Beowulf
Richard Fahey, University of Notre Dame 

Richard Fahey is a PhD candidate at the University of Notre Dame, who is scheduled to graduate this January. In addition to his studies, Richard serves as Assistant Project Manager for Notre Dame’s Medieval Studies Research Blog and Assistant Book Review Editor for the Journal of Religion & Literature. His research areas include allegory, monstrosity, wonders and riddles, especially in Old English, Latin, Old Norse-Icelandic and Middle English literature. Richard is also interested medievalism, including the works of J. R. R. Tolkien and George R. R. Martin, and modern adaptations of medieval literature.

 “Vegetarianism and Synthetic Blood: Green Neoliberal Vampires”
Jessica Hautsch, Stony Brook University 

Jessica Hautsch is a PhD student at Stony Brook University. She has published and presented numerous papers about the Whedonverse focusing on representations of race and gender in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Her current research combines rhetorical and cognitive theory in an analysis of reading and writing practices in digital fan communities.

“In the Footsteps of Fox Mulder: When Will We Know?”
Don Vescio, Worcester State University 

Don Vescio is a faculty member of Worcester State University’s Department of English.  After serving ten years as Worcester State’s Chief Information Office/Vice President of Information Technologies, and two years as Vice President of Enrollment Management and Marketing, Don now focuses his energies on teaching undergraduate and graduate students in a variety of disciplines.  His research interests are in critical theory, narratological analysis, and information design.


Session 6: Saturday 11:00am- 12:15pm
Monsters and the Monstrous II: Everyday Monsters (Thaxter, Lobby Level)
Chair: Richard Fahey, University of Notre Dame 

“Blood-Drinkers of the Nineteenth Century”
Rachel Widmer, University of Arkansas

Rachel Widmer is a Masters student at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. She is currently working on her Master’s Thesis which focuses on an unusual blood cure for consumption in nineteenth century America, and its cultural implications as related to the vampire from the Romantic Period into modern day. She works as a Registrar at a small museum, and lives with her boyfriend, Joel and her adorable cat, Lucifer.

 “The Girl in The Seven Year Itch is a Monster”
Abigail Driver, University of West Georgia 

Abigail Driver is currently completing her M.A. in English at The University of West Georgia. Her special areas of research are women's literature, monstrosity, and pedagogy. In addition, Abigail is an English teacher in Carrollton, Georgia. She teaches 9th grade English and AP Literature and Composition. Her passion is helping students discover new perspectives on literature.

 “The Familiar Other in Derf Backderf’s My Friend Dahmer
Patrick Woodstock, Concordia University 

Patrick Woodstock is currently completing his MA in Film Studies at Concordia University in Montréal. His research is primarily concerned with the application of queer and feminist perspectives towards contemporary and historical popular visual cultures, with a specific focus on classical Hollywood, camp, horror media and the histories of decadent aesthetics.



Session 8: Saturday, 3:00pm- 4:15pm 
Monsters and the Monstrous III: Monsters and their Afterlives (Thaxter, Lobby Level)
Chair: Ava Brillat, University of Miami 

“Individuation and the Beast Within: A Jungian Interpretation of Andre Norton’s The Year of the Unicorn” (102)
Kathleen Healey, Worcester State University

Dr. Kathleen Healey is an adjunct instructor at Worcester State University.  She is the co-editor with Sharon Healey Yang of Gothic Landscapes: Changing Eras, Changing Cultures, Changing Anxieties.  Her publications include essays on gothic literature and the relationship between literature and the visual arts. 


“King Arthur vs. Cthulhu: The Motif of Arthur Redivivus in Lovecraft-inspired Arthuriana”
Michael A. Torregrossa, Independent Scholar 

Michael A. Torregrossa is Monsters and the Monstrous Area Chair. He is a graduate if the Medieval Studies program at the University of Connecticut (Storrs), and his research focuses on aspects of the medieval in popular culture, including fiction, film and television, and comics.

“The Kids Aren’t Alright: Monstrous Children and Parental Fears”
Ava Brillat, University of Miami, and April Mann, University of Miami 

Ava Brillat is the Learning & Research Services Librarian for English, Theatre Arts, and Classical Studies at the University of Miami.  She has presented on the family as the source of fear and the abject in horror movies at the Pop Culture Association/ American Culture Association Annual Meeting in 2019.  Her genre research is focused on familial relationships in horror movies.
April Mann is a senior lecturer in the University of Miami’s Composition Program, teaching courses in first year writing for Engineering students and advanced writing for STEM fields.  She has directed the Writing Center since 2004 and provided grant- and article-writing support to the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine since 2015.  April has recently co-authored an article entitled “Crossing the Bridge: Writing and Research Bridge Programming for an Intensive English Program” in the edited collection Teaching, Information Literacy, and Writing Studies. V.2, Upper Level and Graduate Courses.

Sunday, October 13, 2019

CFP Not Dead, But Dreaming: Reading Lovecraft in the 21st Century (11/30/2019)

CFP: Not Dead, But Dreaming: Reading Lovecraft in the 21st Century
In CFP On September 5, 2019
https://www.fantastic-arts.org/2019/cfp-not-dead-but-dreaming-reading-lovecraft-in-the-21st-century/

Edited Volume CFP

Not Dead, But Dreaming: Reading Lovecraft in the 21st Century

In the one hundred and twenty-nine years since his birth, H. P. Lovecraft’s reputation has grown beyond all expectation. Not only has he influenced generations of readers, but he has also influenced scores of people in areas such as filmmaking, television, comics, music, and literary theory. Because interest in Lovecraft continues to grow, our intention is to explore some of the reasons why he has become so influential—and so indispensable—since the early 1990s. From his stories of human degeneration that started with “The Tomb” and “Dagon” to the cosmic horror that culminated in The Shadow out of Time and “The Haunter of the Dark,” the less than 20 years that Lovecraft devoted to a career in fiction produced narratives that remain popular among a growing number of readers who follow his work from multiple areas of interest. Additionally, Lovecraft’s literary production in general has also become increasingly relevant from an academic perspective since at least the 1990s. In this volume, we want to reflect on the possible reasons for Lovecraft’s expanding popularity and the significance of his legacy as we entered the digital age. Consequently, we are interested in research that focuses on the significance of Lovecraft’s work from the 1990s to the present day.

Possible topics to explore in the work of Lovecraft and its connection with the 1990s to the present might include, but are not limited to:

• The Anthropocene
• Influence in videogames
• Lovecraft Adaptations, including his influence on film and art in general
• Lovecraft’s philosophical thought
• Lovecraft’s poetry
• Lovecraft related RPGs and LARs
• Lovecraftian families
• Object Oriented Ontology
• Posthumanism
• Postmodernism

Please send a proposal of about 500 words, for chapters of 6000-7000 words, and a short biography to Tony Alcala antonio.alcala@tec.mx or Carl Sederholm csederholm@gmail.com, by 30 Nov 2019.

Contributors can expect to be selected and notified by 15th December 2019. The deadline for submission of completed articles will be 30 May 2019.